Under the Tap

Craft Beer, Craft People, Craft Places

Tag: local

One World Brewing

Visit Date: Monday July 16, 2018

I’ve passed it several times before today…..the sign that says, “One World Brewing Come Have a Pint!” A thin arrow underneath the lettering points into a shallow alley way that seems to be a dead-end. There are a few smokers on a bench holding pints of what appears to be craft beer, this is the only clue that the brewery does in fact exist down there. So this trip to Asheville, wandering the streets alone, I decided to finally stop in.

Just before the alley way ends, on the right,  there’s a black door inside of an arc of metal that looks like big barrel ring. There’s a round One World Brewing sign and another arrow pointing down. I go down three short, dark flights of stairs. At the bottom, I enter a door with a small window that looks like I might have to know a password to enter. I walk in and instantly feel like I’ve found a secret place. It’s not as packed as some breweries in downtown Asheville, however it is just before dinner on a Monday. There’s room for me at the bar. The bartender welcomes me and slides me a menu. Her name is Jess. She’s making recommendations to a couple several stools down from me. They seem surprisingly pleased with her choices. I compliment the place – she tells me how much she loves it….her job, the beer, everything. She says, “Time flies down here. I come into work, I have a few steady rushes and, before I know it, it’s 5:30 and I’m on that side of the bar.” She tells me that she tried over 50 craft beers at Beer City Fest this year and was still partial to their beer. I love seeing people taking pride in their work. I listen as Jess engages everyone at the bar. She knows her stuff.

I ordered a 10oz pour of the I’m Singing to Nelson Ain’t I Baby Brett India Pale Ale. It’s hazy, juicy, and hoppy with just a slight bit of funk. Very tasty.

Beer in hand, I find a place at a table so I can write and wait for AJ. The table is along a short barn-wood wall that separates the seating area from the brewing space. From here I can see the tanks and the brewhouse….my favorite seat in any brewery. One World is a small-batch, hand-craft, nano-brewery. They do not package, however there are a few places around Asheville where you may find their beer on tap.

I scan the room and try to take it in as I sip my beer. The door, the lighting, the music selection and sound, the feng shui, everything about the space is great. There are dart boards on the wall and some kind of Dutch Shuffleboard game that I’m not familiar with. Would love to come back when the place is packed. There’s a sign advertising open mic on Mondays at 7:30pm. Maybe I’ll try to make it back for that sometime.

For my second beer, I ordered a When Doves Cryo India Pale Ale. It’s dry-hopped 4 times with Citra, Mosaic, and Simcoe. Lots of intense hoppiness, but not really bitter. Another tasty brew.

One World Brewing did open a new location in West Asheville this year! The new brewery has two floors and a huge outdoor venue and parking lot! Though it is a lot less hidden than the downtown location, it’s still a gem!

   

One World Brewing in  downtown Asheville is located at 10 Patton Avenue, Asheville, North Carolina 28801. It is under Farm Burger, with an entrance in the alley way between Farm Burger and Salsa’s. The West Asheville location is at 520 Haywood Road, Asheville, North Carolina 28806. Both locations are open 7 days a week! Visit their website or find them on Facebook for more info.

 

 

Beer & Wine Express

There’s a fancy new beer store near me, so you know I had to check it out…….a lot. And of course, I went back with my camera.img_5123

Beer & Wine Express is located in Cherokee, NC just off of Highway 74 on Highway 441 North. For me this is just a scenic drive a couple exits up from Bryson City. It is a family owned business and they have made me feel more than welcome every time I’ve visited. The building is brand img_5126new and the store is always spotless and orderly. They have a very large floor plan with a lot of room for growth.

 

The craft beer selection contains all my favorites and many I have yet to try. The shelves are stocked with plenty of brews from right here in North Carolina. I’ve also picked up beers from all over the US that I’ve never seen here. I wish I could give you the full list, guess you’ll just have to check it out for yourself.

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Mountain Layers Brewing Gets Tanks!

I was enjoying a leisurely morning at the house when my friend Ben called.

“Are you at La Dolce Vita?”

“No, I’m at home.”

“They’re moving tanks in at Mountain Layers Brewing.”

I got dressed, grabbed my camera, and headed out the door. He was right. Right now, even as I type, they are moving in  shiny new tanks. This is a huge step for them. A lot of hard work has accumulated to this moment. The place is buzzing, and they aren’t even making beer yet!

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As I made my way down Everett Street today I could see the big wooden crates out front and began to feel the excitement. Upon arrival, I shook hands with owner Mark Pettit and asked to take photos. Kim Pettit took me in through the back door to show me how close things were getting inside. I felt like I was part of the experience. Mark and Kim make everyone feel that way.  I was happy to see the teamwork going into getting the tanks unloaded and moved inside, which is not an easy feat.  Along side owner Mark and brewer Noah McIntee was Greg Geiger, brewmaster from Nantahala Brewing Company.  A beautiful sign of community, businesses working together to bring more people into our small mountain town.

I will be making my way back over for more photos once all the tanks are in place. I always love being a part of the action. I am posting some photos from this morning for you to enjoy. Can’t wait for these things to be filled with liquid goodness!

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Mountain Layers Brewing Company is located at 90 Everett Street in Bryson City, NC. Check out their website or follow them on Facebook to keep up with the progress.

Why Fear Big Beer?

There are always going to be big guys and bullies. There is always going PBR3to be competition and challenge. Why fear it?

They started small, or smaller, like you. They chose their path, as small breweries will have to do as natural growth occurs. Big beer has always been there,  why fear it now? Is it because they are buying us out? But, some of us are selling. Is it because they appear to be bullies? We know how to deal with those guys on the playground……don’t we?

What do we do? To consumers, craft beer lovers, and small business supporters, I say this: continue to buy local craft brews! Buy them from small breweries, gas stations, grocery stores, and bottle shops. Order them at bars and restaurants, and if your favorite spot doesn’t carry them, ask! To taproom, bar, and restaurant owners: buy local craft beers! Support your local and regional economies. There are small craft breweries all over the U.S. and the numbers are growing. To brewers and brewery owners: Keep on being awesome people in a world of bullies. Keep on brewing. Keep on coming up with fresh ideas and reinventing old favorites. Keep giving your distributers a reason to push your product. After all, when you make a tasty brew that sells itself, no incentives are needed.

An Open Letter to Brewery Owners

“Growth for the sake of growth is the ideology of the cancer cell.”  – Edward Abbey

IMG_1527We are well into the rise of the craft beer scene and it doesn’t seem to be slowing down. New breweries are opening, seemingly every week. Lots of small breweries have kicked it in to high gear to expand. The interest is there so, why not? Banks are ready to give business loans to brewery owners with dreams. Private investment firms want a chunk of the action so they are chomping at the bit to get involved and expand their portfolios. Even big beer wants in.

It is a fabulous business to be a part of and a wonderful time to get in. It is full of great people producing great products, and long-term breweries willing to share their knowledge.  However, with a growing scene there is a growing sense of competition and with competition, often times, comes ego. While many of you are managing to grow while staying humble and true to your roots, some of you are letting it go to your head. And I don’t mean an awesome frothy head.

11958174_10153103929540905_1996659729759751727_oI once served as VP to a fast growing NC brewery. When I first started the job we used to jokingly say that this industry was less than 1% asshole. After doing the job two years, I was sure I had met the entire 1% or else the number was climbing. I have seen breweries leave their small towns for beer fests with their chests puffed out so high they can’t see their consumer. Their ego blinded them from every customer that wanted to make contact, from every blogger that wanted to say hello, and from every fellow brewer who just wanted to feel like part of a team. I have seen tourists stop owners and brewers to offer compliments and be treated like a waste of time. I have visited brewery taprooms where pretentiousness flowed more freely than the beer. I can’t wrap my head around this. You are producing something that makes people happy! Why not let the people tell you how happy they are?

Now with all that said, I do understand ho12065503_10153499761747107_8462991802045593468_nw much work is involved in running a full-scale production brewery. I know that stopping to tell someone they are appreciated isn’t what’s on your mind when you’re trying to figure out how to fill 5 pallets with bottled beer in an afternoon and your Maheen just went down. A lot of these small courtesies are often left to other employees. Taproom managers, bartenders, and wait staff should be trained, not just for the physical labor part of the job, but to have your best interest in mind when speaking to customers. There’s nothing worse than being a day laborer who has to say “that WAS the owner” after unpleasant experiences are had and complaints need to be made. Most of you are excellent at managing money and time, but aren’t made to be in the public eye. That’s ok! Let your employees be the smiling face you can’t be!

It is possible to be awesome and not think you are better than everyone else. Don’t forget where you would be without the customer. Another important thing to remember is that every time a patron leaves your bar, they are taking the notes from that experience back to their families, friends, and social media accounts. Word of mouth is a great asset. Don’t ruin that by letting a sense of pride do the talking for you. Also, most of you are bringing an amazing economic impact to the small towns you are in, but that doesn’t mean you should treat the locals like you’re doing them a favor by being there. Be partners with your community! Make them more than grateful you are there.

I guess this could be an open letter to all business owners and operators. Choose community over commerce and let the growth happen naturally. As you expand, do so with your roots in mind as well as your goals. Slow steady growth is better than rushed ideas and poorly executed visions. Rely on your team. Be leaders, not bosses.

If you’re doing something you love, why not do it with love?

Stay Humble. Cheers.

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